Psychology: Theology/Biblical Studies

This series of courses provides students with essential biblical and theological understanding prerequisite to effective integration of the disciplines of psychology and theology (18 credits required).

RSTH 515 - Theological and Psychological Anthropology ICredits 2

This two semester, team-taught course has as its overall aim the development of a relational understanding of the human person. Contributions from theology include a discussion of the creation of humanity in the image of God, the subsequent distortion of that image due to the fall, an understanding of sin (both original sin, being sinned against, and habituated personal sins), and a relational understanding of Christian salvation as the deepest solution to the sin problem. This relational theology will be brought into conversation with a relational understanding of human nature from the vantage point of psychology and related disciplines in order to bring about a robust relational anthropology. This discussion will include integrating contributions from attachment theory, emotion research, neuroscience, infant research, and relational psychoanalysis. Special attention is given to helping the student come to their own depth understanding of the essential role human and divine relationships play in psychopathology and health, including the students' own experience of and resistance to such an understanding. Note(s): Required of Ph.D., Psy.D.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Graduate Level or Doctoral Level.

RSTH 516 - Theological and Psychological Anthropology IICredits 2

This two semester, team-taught course has as its overall aim the development of a relational understanding of the human person. Contributions from theology include a discussion of the creation of humanity in the image of God, the subsequent distortion of that image due to the fall, an understanding of sin (both original sin, being sinned against, and habituated personal sins), and a relational understanding of Christian salvation as the deepest solution to the sin problem. This relational theology will be brought into conversation with a relational understanding of human nature from the vantage point of psychology and related disciplines in order to bring about a robust relational anthropology. This discussion will include integrating contributions from attachment theory, emotion research, neuroscience, infant research, and relational psychoanalysis. Special attention is given to helping the student come to their own depth understanding of the essential role human and divine relationships play in psychopathology and health, including the students' own experience of and resistance to such an understanding. Note(s): Required of Ph.D., Psy.D.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Graduate Level or Doctoral Level.

RSTH 540 - Theology I: Theoretical Foundations of IntegrationCredits 2

This course serves as an introduction to the content, methods, task, and goals of systematic theology, particularly for those students who have had little to no formal training in theology. It will provide an overview of the basic concepts in each of the topics in Christian doctrine and will discuss their inter-relationship to each other. The relevance of theological theories and concepts to psychological theories and concepts will be noted throughout the course. Special focus will be applied to the doctrine of the Trinity as the organizing principle for Christian theology.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Graduate Level or Doctoral Level.

RSTH 550 - Theology II: Spiritual Theology and the Dynamics of ChangeCredits 3

This course treats the nature of new life in Christ, the role and meaning of the cross in the Christian life, and the process of formation in the Spirit. Particular attention is given to understanding the implications of life in Christ regarding guilt, shame, legalism, and loneliness as well as the New Covenant ministry of the Spirit in transforming the heart in light of the dynamics of original sin, early relational development, and the habits of sin developed over time. Attention is also given to the developmental stages of spiritual growth. Note(s): Required of Psy.D., Ph.D.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Graduate Level or Doctoral Level.

RSTH 613 - Theology III: Spiritual Theology and the Dynamics of Change IICredits 3

This course continues the discussion of spiritual formation/sanctification with a focus on the means of grace. The course focuses on the Spirit's use of the Word of God, the people of God, trials, and spiritual disciplines in Christian transformation. The interrelationship of natural formation and spiritual formation is also explored. Note(s): Required Psy.D., Ph.D.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Graduate Level or Doctoral Level.

RSTH 614 - Theology IV: Biblical Interpretation and New Testament PsychologyCredits 3

This course is meant to assist the student in the investigation of what Scripture has to offer for the development of psychological theory and practice. The course covers the nature and authority of Scripture, the illumination of the Spirit, and biblical hermeneutics. The course will include a study of various biblical texts that are particularly relevant for psychological theory and practice as well as a hermeneutical project that requires each student to interpret, contextualize, and apply a biblical passage relevant to psychological theory and/or practice. Note(s): Required of Psy.D., Ph.D.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Graduate Level or Doctoral Level.

RSTH 615 - Theology V: The Kingdom of God and Human FlourishingCredits 3

This course develops a theology of the kingdom of God as providing a comprehensive vision of the Christian life in the present age and the age to come. Attention is given to how the work of the Christian psychologist fits within God's kingdom plan as well as the notion of a vocational calling to psychology as "kingdom work." Life within the kingdom of God requires an understanding of Christian ethics understood as the theory and praxis of living a good life and being a good person. Special attention is given to the place of moral values in psychological theory and practice, the history of ethical theory, virtue ethics, and developing an informed position on contemporary ethical issues (e.g., abortion, divorce, social justice, etc.). Since the ultimate fulfillment of ethics is the prefect shalom of God's fully realized kingdom, this course also addresses the issues in eschatology, including a theology of death, the intermediate state, heaven and hell. Note(s): Required of Psy.D., Ph.D.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Graduate Level or Doctoral Level.

RSTH 730 - Independent StudyCredits 1-3

Individual work, directed reading or special problems in theology. Such study must be done with the approval and supervision of a faculty professor of record. The student is expected to submit a detailed course proposal on an arranged course form available from the Registrar's Office. Note(s): Required courses may not be taken through independent study. Elective.
Grade Mode: A.
Restrictions: Must be Rosemead Sch of Psychology; and Graduate Level or Doctoral Level.